Creating multilingual Site Definitions with Visual Studio 2010 SharePoint Development Tools

When working on SharePoint Solutions one of the common requirements is delivering multilingual solutions. Depending on your scenario you might either need to localize a single Web Part or a complete Solution. Thinking of multiple languages you have to take into account not only the development but also the packaging process for all the different assets in your Solution. One of such assets, where implementing support for multiple languages in SharePoint 2010 might seem complex at first sight, are Site Definitions. However you can easily create a multilingual Site Definition using nothing more than the standard capabilities  of the new Visual Studio 2010 SharePoint Developer Tools.

Did you know: configuring Solution Dependencies in SharePoint 2010

When SharePoint 2007 shipped with the Features and Solutions framework we thought we had it all sorted out. We were able to package our work and deploy it in a structured and repeatable manner. Using Feature Activation Dependencies we were able to ensure that all the functionality that our components require are available prior to provision our custom functionality. And while Feature Dependencies are definitely a great concept they are unfortunately incomplete. If all the different pieces come from a single Solution then Feature Dependencies are sufficient. However if your resources are spread across different Solution the only piece of feedback you will get from Feature Dependencies is message saying that a Feature with some id is missing in your Farm. Luckily this situation has changed with SharePoint 2010 and the introduction of Solution Dependencies.

Logging to ULS in SharePoint 2010

One of the pieces of developing custom components is logging information. No matter if it’s for diagnostic purposes or when an error occurs, logging allows you to track the health of your custom component. When developing custom components for SharePoint 2007 we hadn’t much choice. Although SharePoint 2007 shipped with the Unified Logging Service, we couldn’t use it. The SharePoint SDK was pretty clear about it: although some methods were publicly available, ULS was for internal use only and was not supposed to be used in custom code. Because of this, we couldn’t provide a similar logging experience to SharePoint and had to develop custom logging solutions. SharePoint 2010 changes this situation: using the new ULS is now supported and may be used for logging in custom code.

Inconvenient good page title with SharePoint Server Web Content Management (revisited)

One of the things that matter when optimizing an Internet-facing website for search engines is the page title. Next to the level one header (H1) and the URL, the page title is one of the most important elements of your page that allows search engine to find your page. A good page title consists of at least the title of the current page and the title of the website. Additionally, if the site is quite large you can add the name of the section. And although it doesn’t sound like rocket science it is quite inconvenient to do it right in SharePoint.