A better way to obtain objects from cache

Last week I have posted a better approach to getting field values from an SPListItem. Today I’ve found out that you can actually use almost the same approach to get stuff from the ASP.NET cache.

Google Search Engine Optimization Starter Guide

To simplify the process of optimizing websites for search engines, Google has published yesterday the Search Engine Optimization Starter Guide. Although this is the first time that Google publishes such document, the guide contains many different practices which should help you get the most of your site and reach your audience. You should definitely check it out no matter if you are a developer, a designer or a content author. As long as you have anything to do with web technologies, the guide applies to you.

Microsoft SharePoint Team help solve the problem of disposable objects

The SharePoint team has just announced that they are working on a tool which will help SharePoint developers to deal with disposable objects in custom code. SPDisposeCheck – as the tool is called, will check custom compiled assemblies and validate them against the Microsoft guidance.

A better way to obtain fields values of an SPListItem

Obtaining the value of a particular field (SPField) of a list item (SPListItem) is quite awkward. First of all you have to pass either the index, Id or the InternalName of an existing field. If the field exists a value of the object type is being returned. In some cases that value can be null. If it’s not you can cast it to its origin type as in most cases defined by the SPField.FieldValueType Property. Imagine doing all that each time you want to retrieve a field value. Isn’t there a better way?

Should I use tables for layout?

I’ve just stumbled upon a new campaign called: “Give up and use tables”. Two guys: Todd A and Brian Matthews seem to be tired of wasting their time on making things work CSS. Instead they suggest using tables and even offer to provide you with the HTML code you need. To make it even better they provide a little app: a counter which measures how much time you already spent on making CSS work. Should you really be using tables for layout?