No-code content targeting in SharePoint 2010

No-code SharePoint solutions became very popular in the last two years. Having virtually no deployment boundaries they are ideal for power users to enhance their sites with new dynamic functionality. While SharePoint 2007 already allowed us to do some great stuff with no-code solutions, thanks to the JavaScript Object Model provided with SharePoint 2010 we can make even richer solution without a single line of server-side code. And while retrieving information from SharePoint is pretty cool, being able to target it to your users is what it takes to use no-code solutions on Internet-facing websites.

Inconvenient SharePoint 2010 Content Query Web Part and Anonymous Access

Since the release of Microsoft Office SharePoint Server 2007 the Content Query Web Part (CQWP) has served us very well as probably the best content aggregation solution available on the SharePoint platform. And while I’ve been using it heavily for Web Content Management solutions for the last three years with great success, I got really surprised when I found out that the CQWP provided with SharePoint 2010 doesn’t work with anonymous access!

Inconvenient Content Query Web Part slots

We all know Content Query Web Part (CQWP) – probably the greatest Web Part provided with SharePoint Server that allows you to build dynamic content aggregations in a matter of minutes. CQWP is known not only for its great performance but also for its flexibility and extensibility capabilities. In SharePoint Server 2010 Content Query Web Part introduces even more functionality among which the slots – a cool feature that allows you to create semantic and reusable templates. And while creating new templates became as simple as it was never before there is one thing that you should keep in mind while working with Content Query Web Part slots.

Mavention Instant Page Create

Do you still remember how many clicks did you need in Microsoft Office SharePoint Server 2007 to create a new Publishing Page? First you had to pick the New Page option from the Site Actions menu. Then you had to provide some information about the page and then finally, after pressing the OK button, you were redirected to the newly created page. SharePoint Server 2010 simplifies that process, but did you know that you can push it even further, and create new Publishing Pages with a single mouse click?