Inconvenient Content Query Web Part and server-relative URLs

Content Query Web Part is probably the best solution for creating dynamic content rollups in SharePoint 2010. It’s lightning fast and because it’s using XSLT it allows you to easily change layout without touching your data. And although changing the presentation in Content Query Web Part is a matter of a few mouse clicks, it gets quite inconvenient when you start using custom XSLT files.

Programmatically adding Web Parts to Rich Content in SharePoint 2010

SharePoint 2010 ships with the great ability of adding Web Parts to content areas. This allows you to easily extend your content with dynamic elements providing your users with richer experience. Similarly to using Web Parts with Web Part Zones you should include Web Parts in Rich Content in your structured and repeatable deployment. There are however a few differences in how you provision Web Parts to Rich Content and knowing how it all works can make your life easier.

Easy access to SharePoint Central Administration for developers

One of the places you visit on regular as a SharePoint developer is Central Administration. From there you can deploy Solutions, create Web Applications and Site Collections and Manage Service Applications. And although most developer spend a fair amount of time in Central Administration it’s quite surprising that the only way to get there is either by memorizing a random port or using the shortcut from the Start menu. But there is a better way.

Better conditional content for anonymous users with LoginView

SharePoint 2010 ships with the SPSecurityTrimmedControl that allows you to conditionally display content to users based on their permissions. On top of that it gives you the ability to display content to anonymous/authenticated users only which unfortunately doesn’t work. And although you might want start off and develop something of your own, it turns out that for all this time there was a solution for this just around the corner.

Programmatically granting permissions to claims

Programmatically granting permissions in SharePoint 2007 wasn’t that very complicated. You could grant permissions either to a User or a Group and in order to do that all you needed was a reference to that User/Group. As you might have heard SharePoint 2010 supports claims based identity what allows you to grant permissions using the identity of the user rather than a specific way of authentication. If you’ve looked through the public SharePoint 2010 API you might have noticed that there is no specific method that allows you to programmatically grant permissions to a claim. So how do you do that?