Content targeting for anonymous users with SharePoint Server 2010 (part 1 of 2)

SharePoint Server 2010 ships with the content targeting capability based on Audiences. Using this mechanism you can conditionally display content to groups of users based on their profiles. One shortcoming of this approach is that it needs user profiles which are not available on Internet-facing websites for anonymous users. However, using nothing more than the standard capabilities of the SharePoint framework and ASP.NET you can easily extend the standard content targeting mechanism to support targeting anonymous users.

Microsoft Silverlight 4 and SharePoint 2010 Integration (book review)

SharePoint 2010 ships with native support for Silverlight what makes creating Rich Internet Applications (RIA) easier and faster. And although Silverlight has been around for a couple of years now, there is more to developing Silverlight RIAs on SharePoint 2010. While you could use the classic – web-services-based approach, SharePoint 2010 ships with the Silverlight Object Model which makes it easy to work with data from SharePoint in Silverlight applications.

Simple SharePoint 2010 Replaceable Parameters with Mavention Replaceable Parameters Snippets

The new Visual Studio 2010 SharePoint Developer Tools ship with Replaceable Parameters which allow you to provide values for SharePoint solution items whose actual values are not known at the design time. And while the Replaceable Parameters are without a doubt a great improvement in the development process, there is one problem with them: there are quite a few of them and looking up the right one might get you out of element when developing. And this is exactly where Mavention Replaceable Parameters Snippets come in.

Programmatically determining which Claims Authentication Type has been used to login with Claims Based Authentication

Claims Based Authentication introduced with SharePoint 2010 allows you to login to a SharePoint site using multiple Authentication Providers. In some scenario you might need to determine which Claims Authentication Type has been used to login in order to conditionally show some content. Find out how this can be done using the new Claims API provided with SharePoint 2010.

Programmatically converting login name to claim and vice versa

SharePoint 2010 introduced Claims Based Authentication. One of the consequences of this is the fact that in order to use Forms Based Authentication (FBA) you need to configure your Web Application to use Claims instead of Classic Authentication. One of the many changes that you notice while working with claims are different login names: while in SharePoint 2007 you used something like myprovider:myuser, SharePoint 2010 makes the claims-soup of it: i:0\#.f|myprovider|myuser. And while this is something you can take into account for newly created solutions, it can get confusing when upgrading SharePoint 2007 solutions to SharePoint 2010, especially if all you need is the user name. So is String.Replace the only way to get it out or is there a better way?