How we did it: mavention.nl – Part 2a: Dealing with minified files

In the previous part of the How we did it series about our new website I told you about how we optimized our website for performance. One of the optimization techniques that we applied was minifying asset files such as CSS and JavaScript. While minification allows you to decrease the size of files it has one serious disadvantage: it often makes them unreadable. So how did we deal with it?

Dynamically loading JavaScript from within Sandbox

SharePoint 2010 ships with the Sandbox capability that allows you to isolate custom code and run it in a safe manner. And while it offers you some great possibilities it also has some limitations as pointed recently by Wictor. One of such limitations is no access to the Page.ClientScript which is being used to register JavaScript scripts from within Web Parts. Find out how you can work around this limitation using standard capabilities of the SharePoint 2010 framework.

SharePoint 2010 UI Tip: non-obtrusive progress messages

SharePoint 2010 ships with a new User Interface framework that allows you to easily create rich user experiences. While developing custom solutions one of the challenges is to communicate long-running operations with the user: after all there is nothing more annoying than a non-responsive UI. Find out how the new UI framework of SharePoint 2010 supports communicating the progress notifications to users.

SharePoint 2010 Application Pages and Modal Dialogs the easy way

SharePoint 2010 ships with the new Modal Dialog framework that allows you to display dialog windows in an unobtrusive and user friendly way. This is extremely important when creating user friendly solutions as it allows users to preserve their context while providing some additional information. While the new modal dialog framework is definitely a great idea, there is one thing missing in the implementation: support for communicating with custom application pages.

SharePoint 2010 Page Components in Sandboxed Solutions

SharePoint 2010 ships with the new Ribbon framework that allows you to easily extend the Ribbon with new functionality. All Ribbon extensions consist of the UI and behavior, which in simple scenarios can be specified declaratively but in more advanced scenarios would rely on a Page Component. Most samples, that show using Page Components, suggest registering them using Delegate Controls. Unfortunately this makes it impossible to use Page Component in Sandboxed Solutions which don’t support Delegate Controls. So are we forced to use the limited declarative approach or is there a solution that would allow us to register custom Page Components within Sandboxed Solutions?