“The name ‘InitializeControl’ does not exist in the current context” - Visual Web Part (Sandboxed) bug and how to fix it

A while ago Microsoft provided us with Visual Studio 2010 SharePoint Power Tools – a set of productivity extensions for the Visual Studio 2010 SharePoint Developer Tools. One of the improvements shipped with the Power Tools is the Visual Web Part (Sandboxed) that – as the name says it – allows you to both benefit of the great design capabilities of Visual Web Part while still being able to deploy it to Sandbox. Unfortunately if your Sandboxed Visual Web Part will get too large things won’t be working as expected anymore.

How we did it: mavention.nl – Part 2a: Dealing with minified files

In the previous part of the How we did it series about our new website I told you about how we optimized our website for performance. One of the optimization techniques that we applied was minifying asset files such as CSS and JavaScript. While minification allows you to decrease the size of files it has one serious disadvantage: it often makes them unreadable. So how did we deal with it?

How we did it: mavention.nl – Part 2: Performance

In the previous part of the How we did it series about our new website I told you how we implemented the branding in SharePoint 2010. In this part I will share with you some information about how we optimized our website for performance.

How we did it: mavention.nl – Part 1: Branding

In case you haven’t noticed, recently we launched our new website. In the upcoming series of How we did it articles I will give you a glance under the hood and tell you how we built our site. In this first part I will tell you how we did the branding of our new website.

Productive development of SharePoint 2010 Web Content Management solutions with CKS:DEV

Developing Web Content Management (WCM) solutions on the Microsoft Office SharePoint Server (MOSS) 2007 platform was really challenging. And I’m not talking here about taking care of delivering web standards compliant XHTML, implementing accessibility or making the website lightning fast. I’m talking about the development process itself: from creating the very first custom Site Column to deploying the Solution. There were several tools, none of which fully integrated with Visual Studio or provided a consistent approach. At the end of the day we – SharePoint 2007 developers, became wizards doing the magic of manual tips & tricks and combination of various tools every day just to get the job done. Just recently, when SharePoint 2010 shipped, Microsoft provided us with the new Visual Studio 2010 SharePoint Developer Tools. And although they are called tools, they are more than that. In fact Microsoft provided us with a framework for building developer tools. A new era has come.