Community Kit for SharePoint: Development Tools Edition

I was not the only one who created and published extensions for the Visual Studio SharePoint development tools. First there was the SPVSX toolkit by Matt Smith, Wesley Hackett and Todd Bleeker. Then, just a few weeks ago, Wouter van Vugt published his cool toolkit on-line. At some point we all noticed that while we could continue creating new extensions individually, the real power was to join the forces.

Imtech Get SPMetal Definition Extension – Now with support for Lists!

A few weeks ago I published an extension for the new Visual Studio SharePoint development tools that simplifies working with SPMetal. Upon installation the extension adds a menu to every Site node in SharePoint Explorer. Using that menu option you can generate the SPMetal definition just as if you would use the SPMetal command line interface itself.

Imtech List EventReceivers Extension

Imtech List EventReceivers Extension is an extension for the new Visual Studio SharePoint development tools that allows you to explore the Event Receivers attached to a specific List.

Imtech Style Library Extension

The Imtech Style Library Extension has been inspired by the Imtech Master Pages and Page Layouts Extension. The edit functionality that it provides has been something that I have used a lot while working with developing SharePoint solutions on SharePoint 2007. For the last few years I’ve been working almost exclusively on Web Content Management (WCM) solutions. One thing that I’ve been editing perhaps even more than Page Layouts and Master Pages were the XSLT files used by the Content Query Web Part (CQWP). Looking at the enhancements of the CQWP in SharePoint 2010 I will be very likely using it heavily as well. To make working with these XSLT files easier, I decided to create an extension for the Visual Studio SharePoint development tools that would allow to view and edit the contents of the XSL files used by the CQWP.

Imtech Master Pages and Page Layouts Extension

In the last few posts I wrote about the Visual Studio SharePoint development tools and showed you a few cool things that you can achieve using the extensibility API provided with the tools. The extensions I previously showed you, allowed you to explore SharePoint objects or generate items out of it. But did you know that using the new Visual Studio SharePoint development tools you can also create extensions that will allow you to edit SharePoint objects?