SharePoint redirects revisited: using 301 instead of 302 (without code!)

Nearly a year ago I wrote an article about why you should be using permanent redirects (301) instead of temporary redirects (302) which are SharePoint defaults. Back then I presented a custom HTTP Module as a possible solution. Since then things changed a little: we have SharePoint 2010, which still has the same challenge, and we have IIS7 which allows us to get things done without a single line of code.

SharePoint 2010 ‘Page not found (404)’ page the way it should be

More and more frequently SharePoint is being used as the platform for Internet-facing websites. Not surprisingly the latest version of SharePoint is greatly improved making it event better solution for creating public websites. Although Microsoft did a great job in the Web Content Management area of SharePoint there are still a few shortcomings, one of which are custom ‘Page not found (404)’ pages. Find out how to do things right when moving your website to the SharePoint platform.

Productive development of SharePoint 2010 Web Content Management solutions with CKS:DEV

Developing Web Content Management (WCM) solutions on the Microsoft Office SharePoint Server (MOSS) 2007 platform was really challenging. And I’m not talking here about taking care of delivering web standards compliant XHTML, implementing accessibility or making the website lightning fast. I’m talking about the development process itself: from creating the very first custom Site Column to deploying the Solution. There were several tools, none of which fully integrated with Visual Studio or provided a consistent approach. At the end of the day we – SharePoint 2007 developers, became wizards doing the magic of manual tips & tricks and combination of various tools every day just to get the job done. Just recently, when SharePoint 2010 shipped, Microsoft provided us with the new Visual Studio 2010 SharePoint Developer Tools. And although they are called tools, they are more than that. In fact Microsoft provided us with a framework for building developer tools. A new era has come.

Disable inserting Web Parts in the SharePoint 2010 Rich Text Editor

SharePoint 2010 ships with a brand new Rich Text Editor which has a dozen of new capabilities. One of those capabilities allows you to insert Web Parts in content which can help you add some rich functionality to your content. And while it sounds pretty cool there are scenarios when you might want to turn inserting Web Parts in content off. In this article you can read about how you can disable inserting Web Parts in the SharePoint 2010 Rich Text Editor.

Inconvenient Content Query Web Part and provisioning it to the right place

Content Query Web Part is one of the most frequently used Web Parts available out of the box with SharePoint Server 2010. Thanks to its flexibility, great performance and rich configuration possibilities it’s a great solution for aggregating content. Because the presentation layer of the CQWP is based on XSLT, the possibilities are virtually unlimited, but as soon as you start using custom XSLT stylesheets some strange things start to happen.