Making controls in a Silverlight/WPF User Control private

By default, when you create a User Control in Silverlight or Windows Presentation Foundation (WPF) all child controls are publicly available. This is not only bad for reusability of the control but also from the design point of view as you should always try to encapsulate the internals of your control and only make available to the outside world functionality that makes sense to them. Additionally encapsulating properties allows you to validate the input what makes your control less error prone.

Inconvenient Silverlight Object Model vs. anonymous users

SharePoint 2010 ships with Silverlight Object Model that simplifies working with SharePoint data within Silverlight components. Thanks to the new object model you no longer have to create and deploy custom services to retrieve data from SharePoint. Out of the box the Silverlight Object Model encapsulates calling standard SharePoint WCF Services which makes it extremely easy for you as a developer to create Silverlight components that communicate with SharePoint. Although working with the Silverlight Object Model is pretty easy, there is one thing that you have to keep in mind while developing for anonymous users.

Inconvenient Content Query Web Part slots

We all know Content Query Web Part (CQWP) – probably the greatest Web Part provided with SharePoint Server that allows you to build dynamic content aggregations in a matter of minutes. CQWP is known not only for its great performance but also for its flexibility and extensibility capabilities. In SharePoint Server 2010 Content Query Web Part introduces even more functionality among which the slots – a cool feature that allows you to create semantic and reusable templates. And while creating new templates became as simple as it was never before there is one thing that you should keep in mind while working with Content Query Web Part slots.

Inconvenient good page title with SharePoint Server Web Content Management (revisited)

One of the things that matter when optimizing an Internet-facing website for search engines is the page title. Next to the level one header (H1) and the URL, the page title is one of the most important elements of your page that allows search engine to find your page. A good page title consists of at least the title of the current page and the title of the website. Additionally, if the site is quite large you can add the name of the section. And although it doesn’t sound like rocket science it is quite inconvenient to do it right in SharePoint.